Swedesboro Nike Base

You can read more about the Swedesboro Nike base here

I have never visited this location. If anyone can tell me anything about it, I’d appreciate it.

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62 responses to this post.

  1. Hi, I may have posted here some years back but wanted to note I was stationed at Swedesboro from 12/60 thu 2/63 as an IFC radar operator and FUIF mechanic. I took what was called a “short discharge” and reup’d for ABAR mechanic training at Ft Bliss, then went to a Nike Herc site in Nebraska.

    Reply

  2. Posted by Jim Cullen on August 9, 2016 at 3:01 PM

    Hi Guys, I was stationed at the Swedesboro Nike site from 6/62 to 6/65 in the fire control area. I went there directly from basic training at Fort Dix and stayed there until discharge. Got to on SNAP (Short Notice Annual Practice) several times which was live firing at White Sands, New Mexico. Really cool to see the Nike’s take off after incoming targets. I was trained as the Missile Track Radar operator and really enjoyed my time there. I was there when the radar towers were build and the radars lifted up onto them. A lot of alerts and drills. Was there during the Cuban missile crisis when on duty we slept on the radar van floors with gas masks and rifles. During the 3 years I achieved E5 and was a crew chief at the time I left the Army in ’65. Take care Jim

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  3. Hey any veterans who served at PH-58 and I see that several have responded to this blog some years ago. If you get this message, I’m a photographer who is documenting the Nike missile bases in New Jersey and am looking to publish a book. If you would like to be interviewed, please contact me through my website. http://www.richardlewisphotography.com. Feel free to check out my photographs of PH-58, PH23/25 and NY-56 in the gallery.

    Reply

    • Posted by michael kowal on May 12, 2016 at 11:33 PM

      I am a teenager in a neighboring town near this site. I go to the high school Kingsway right down the road from the site and me and my buddies go to this base every chance we can because we love to urbex. Urbex is urban exploring. It’s so fun to climb the towers and hang out near the old underground facilities. I find it so interesting going there and reading up on the place and I love your photos. I will definitely need to purchase that book when it comes out. Any important notices about the book like release dates or what not email me at laxbro1224@gmail.com
      Thank you.

      Reply

  4. Posted by Bill Harmon on February 1, 2016 at 11:45 AM

    I was stationed there from 1969 to 1971. I was a MP. Along with me were Dan Newton, Sam Berkey, Colin Fetch, Tom Pavilonis, Chris Skotak, Rutland Melton, Rich Cornwell, Flea Parrish, and many more I can not remember their names Bill Harmonn, billfharmon@yahoo.com, in Batesville,Ms

    Reply

    • Posted by Bill Harmon on February 1, 2016 at 12:20 PM

      i don’t remember who was manning the radar in the IFC area when a UFO appeared over the Exclusion area. I thought that I was imagining things until you called the hot line and reported your radar sighting. If you get this message, please email me billfharmon@yahoo.com I know whoever reads this will think I am crazy but the guy in the IFC will know. Bill

      Reply

    • In 1960 we called them “dog handlers”. 😉

      Reply

  5. Posted by Dave Winans on July 30, 2015 at 2:07 PM

    I was stationed at PH-58 from 1968 to 1972. I worked in the radar fire control area and became section chief of one crew. All sites with nuclear warheads were under the control of regular army units. Our unit was B-3-43. Many sites were turned over to National Guard Units, but the nukes were removed, leaving only high explosive warhead. Our Battalion HQ was in Penns Grove, NJ. The radar site was across the street from the cemetary. At the time we were surrounded by asparagus fields. Missles were about a half mile down the road, but much further from the highway. Missles were radar guided, meaning radar had to be locked onto the missle to give it commands. It was quite a game we played. Missles were surface to air type and were intended to strike any aircaft that might be bombing the cities on the east coast. Nike sites were all down the east coast and had overlapping territory to monitor.

    Reply

  6. Posted by Sandra W on January 22, 2014 at 11:28 PM

    Hi everyone. I am trying to locate someone stationed at the Swedesboro Nike Base in 1958. Particularly looking for information regarding Jack Padgett. He would have been about 23 then.
    I was adopted and told that he was my father. Just trying to verify information. He would be 78 now – and probably wouldn’t have any skeletons in his closet anymore. Any information is appreciated.

    Reply

  7. Posted by Chad Stevens on October 18, 2013 at 4:47 PM

    Hey All – My father, Emery Stevens, was stationed at PH58 during the late 50s / early 60s. I am trying to help him gather more information on the site and to learn with him and my son. Does anyone have any photos from the site from the period when it was active? I’ve seen the ones folks take now, would like to see it during its glory days!

    Thanks so much, Chad Stevens csteven1@gmailcom

    Reply

    • Posted by Darrell Keighley on October 19, 2013 at 1:21 PM

      I do have pictures, but unfortunately they’re Ectachrome color slides, and I have no way to transfer them into some other form of media. Sorry

      Reply

  8. Posted by Donner on February 6, 2013 at 1:28 PM

    I was stationed there from 1973 to 1974. I was there when the site was closed. I helped pull all the missle rails out of the ground, and remove all the cables from the Launch Control Area.

    I only remember 2 missile pits, each with 6 missles. I worked in the assembly building.

    Kind of tough to see the place looking so ragged. I spent almost 2 years of my mis-spent youth there, have some good memories of the people I served with and some bad memories of the boredom.

    Reply

    • Posted by Jim Tinnes on April 24, 2017 at 8:40 PM

      Donner, this is Jim Tinnes, I’m not sure I knew you but I was stationed there 6/72 – 7/74 just before it was shut down. Very depressing to see a once vibrant facility decaying the way seen in recent photos.

      Reply

      • Posted by Don Ruff on May 5, 2017 at 12:43 PM

        Jim, I remember you from Swedesboro. You had the room across from mine. I had the dog “Mike”, and I think he got into a fight with a kitten you had.

        Reply

  9. Posted by Richard M. Levine on October 25, 2011 at 9:47 AM

    Richard Martinac,

    Please advise what was done in periodic maintenance on nuclear warheads. Was the deterium or tritium recharged? Were they checked for radioactive leaks?

    Reply

    • Posted by Darrell Keighley on October 25, 2011 at 5:25 PM

      Everything was classified- Secret B- Need to know…….meaning, if you didn’t need to know something, to perform your duties, you weren’t told. You would most likely need to contact someone who was on the Warhead Maintenance Team, to find out exactly what happened. I’m fairly certain electrical checks were made, but beyond that, “pit rats,” as we on the Launcher Section crews were called, didn’t have much knowledge, beyond how to get a missle in the air.

      Reply

  10. Posted by Carol A. McFarland on October 7, 2011 at 8:39 AM

    Looking for Cyril M. Iskra who stood with Sherman McMonigal when he got married. Both were stationed at the Nike Base in Swedesboro.

    I am Ruthann’s Aunt and they are celebrating 50 years of marriage. She would like to surprise Sherm.

    Reply

  11. Posted by elchucko on September 28, 2011 at 6:02 PM

    Much information can be found on http://www.ed-thelen.org

    Reply

  12. Posted by Darrell Keighley on September 28, 2011 at 5:26 PM

    There was no “unit Patch” per se, for any of the Nike Sites, Continental US or overseas.
    For the Continental US, members wore an ARADCOM patch (Army Air Defense Command) which was a red shield with a yellow rocket and two yellow lightening bolts.
    Overseas, you wore the Divisional patch of the Division you were assigned to (ie., 44th Artillery, in Korea).

    Reply

  13. Posted by elchucko on September 24, 2011 at 10:14 AM

    Check http://www.ed-thelen.org for information regarding Nike missiles and Swedesboro, NJ

    Reply

  14. Posted by Richard Levine on November 5, 2010 at 5:34 AM

    Since I don’t know what UMG means, I guess that I am not the same Rich Levine.

    Reply

  15. Posted by Richard Levine on November 3, 2010 at 7:20 AM

    I am researching the Franklin Lakes-Mahwah Nike site. I would like to know more about maintaining the nuclear warheads and what that entailed. I read somewhere else that the warheads were wiped, and that the wipes were put into a lead container to be later sent for analysis. Other veterans said that a geiger counter was used only in the missile assembly area. Anyone ever hear about radiation contamination in the missile magazines or elsewhere? Or about containerized radioactive waste?

    I also read in a pub from Los Alamos that these early warheads did not have a sophisticated metalurgy. I took this to mean that the intense radiation from the plutonium deteriorated the warhead casing eventually causing it to leak.

    One of the veterans I interviewed noted that another veteran is investigating a suspected cancer cluster among veterans who used to work there.

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Posted by Darrell Keighley on November 5, 2010 at 3:00 AM

      First, I’m wondering if this is the same Rich Levine I know from the UMGF?
      In answer to your question about radiation leaks at the bases…….I never heard of any, in either, warhead maintenance, or in the magazines. Of course, all information was treated as “need to know” so typically, if you didn’t have a need to know, you weren’t told.
      I had nothing to do with warhead maintenance, per se, however, there were occassions where we wiped down the warheads, to remove dust, while in the magazines. The rags we used weren’t treated any differently than any other rags we used with thrichloroethylene, and were disposed of in the same manner as any other cleaning rags.
      Much of the “maintenance” performed in the magazines, as well as topside in the sections, was purely done to keep people busy, and served no real useful purpose. The net result of much of what was done, only caused harmful exposure to chemicals, for those doing the unnecessary work.
      I never saw a Geiger Counter used, anywhere on base, although i would imagine the warhead maintenance building must’ve had them.
      Good luck with your info search. There must be more of us ARADCOM vets around?

      Reply

    • Posted by Darrell Keighley on September 28, 2011 at 5:35 PM

      I was a Launcher Area Section Chief, during my last two years in the Army, and I never saw a Geiger counter, except on TV. There was no program, on the Nike sites, to detect radiation leakage from the warheads, and I seriously doubt there was any.
      We also did not do anything special with rags used to wipe down dust in the warhead section of the missles. They were disposed of, along with rags used for other purposes.

      Reply

  16. Posted by Richard M. Levine on September 20, 2010 at 8:40 PM

    I am researching the Franklin Lakes-Mahwah Nike site. I would like to know more about maintaining the nuclear warheads and what that entailed. I read somewhere else that the warheads were wiped, and that the wipes were put into a lead container to be later sent for analysis. Other veterans said that a geiger counter was used only in the missile assembly area. Anyone ever hear about radiation contamination in the missile magazines or elsewhere? Or about containerized radioactive waste?

    I also read in a pub from Los Alamos that these early warheads did not have a sophisticated metalurgy. I took this to mean that the intense radiation from the plutonium deteriorated the warhead casing eventually causing it to leak.

    One of the veterans I interviewed noted that another veteran is investigating a suspected cancer cluster among veterans who used to work there.

    Thanks!

    Reply

  17. Posted by Darrell on May 30, 2010 at 11:48 PM

    Agent117, what you described is the Launch Area for Site 58. I was a Section Chief there, from late ’71 to early ’73. The Bldg inside the horseshoe-shaped burm was the warhead bldg, where periodic maintenance was performed on the nuclear warheads. There are no tunnels underground. There are three main underground chambers (the magazines) in which the missles were stored. They were brought up to ground level, by way of an elevator, which itself had a launcher on it. Each Section had three additional stationary launchers, for a total of 12. If the magazines are flooded, as I well suspect they are, it’s pointless to attempt going down inside them, and could be very dangerous.
    The first bldg you mentioned, the L-shaped one, was the Launcher Platoon’s Barracks, which included the Ready Room, Sergeant of The Guard Office, Day Room, Latrine, and individual rooms which were built shortly after I arrived there, to allow more privacy for the men. Prior to that, the barracks were open bay style.
    My room, was the first room on the right, as you entered the front door, adjacent to the SOG Office.
    I was the only Non-Commissioned Officer living on base, at the time.

    Reply

    • Posted by Stosh on August 24, 2010 at 8:56 AM

      Do you have any unclassified pics you can share?

      Stosh

      Reply

      • Posted by Stosh on August 29, 2010 at 7:40 AM

        When I was a child growing up in Swedesboro, riding by the Nike base and seeing the guard at the front gate. I remember the guards wore helmets and dressed emasculate. Having attended Kinsgway Regional H.S., I remember seeing the missiles every day or so, raising up from a there chambers like clockwork… Now knowing that the missiles were part of protecting the east-coast, makes me proud, but at the same time freaked out by the fact that they were nuclear… Oh well, part of life in those days…

        Any more stories? Any pics?

        Stosh

        Reply

        • Posted by Stosh on August 29, 2010 at 7:43 AM

          I meant “immaculate”. The solders dressed immaculately…

          Reply

        • Posted by R.Paul on November 24, 2011 at 11:30 PM

          No one knew that then and we were not allowed to tell ,, but it was safe , nothing to worry about but plenty to be proud about ,,, wish they were still in use but with newer missiles, i was proud to serve there for 3 years …

          Reply

    • Posted by lostinjersey on August 28, 2010 at 9:36 PM

      yeah, ditto. what he said. I promise not to post if you share w/me (unless you’re ok w/that of course)

      Reply

    • Posted by Richard Martinac on October 25, 2011 at 8:57 AM

      Hey Darrell,this is Rick Martinac.Iwas in your crew.Please e-mail me as I have some things to share.

      Reply

  18. Posted by Robert Edgerton on December 3, 2009 at 11:37 AM

    Hi Nike Swedesboro Fans,
    I wish to correct some misinformation about the Nike Swedesboro Site. I noticed some blogs say the Nike swedesboro Site was established in 1957. I can tell you that 1957 is incorrect. I was stationed at what is now referred to as PH-58 1n 1955 and remained there until my discharge in 1956.

    Reply

  19. i live in swedesboro. ive been to the missile base one time. its difficult to get in during the summer because of all the plants grown up over the fense and gate and they are lined with barbed wire. if you want to go do it during the winter and early spring season if you plan to hop the fense. me and some friends went there its pretty cool.

    Reply

  20. Posted by Hunter. aka deadmanrose3 on July 9, 2009 at 1:37 AM

    i live in swedesboro near the nike airbase and have been planning a trip for years. I can’t ever seem to find anyone to go in with but from john/agen 117’s stories it sounds amazing. i would very much like to explore the lower tunnles and examine the animal cages to determined what kind of animals were held. Also the amount of cable and wires in there could be worth quite some cash. Finally i have also heard stories of a future demolision. Time is of the essence. If you wish to contact me you may email my private line at livingdalife@yahoo.com

    ~deadmanrose3~

    Reply

    • Posted by elchucko on September 18, 2011 at 2:05 PM

      Nike Missile Base, not “Nike airbase”. This was a US Army base. Not Air Force. Tunnels? Hmmm.

      I was stationed there 1960/1963

      Reply

    • Posted by R.Paul on November 24, 2011 at 11:45 PM

      All the main wiring has been removed hence all lower tunnels,shafts and bunkers are flooded because the pumps don’t work also access doors are locked or welded shut.. The animals were sentry dogs ,shepards to be exact… Do be careful if you do go visit it’s dangerous in there and it was even when i served there…

      Reply

      • Posted by elchucko on November 25, 2011 at 1:20 AM

        It was not a Nike “airbase”. They were Army bases, not air force bases 😉 Hence the term “Nike Missile Base”. I was stationed at the Swedesboro site 1960 thru 4/63 when it was still a Nike Ajax base, not Hercules.

        Reply

        • Posted by John Babula on October 9, 2015 at 9:31 AM

          I got to Swedesboro December 1962 and they were all Nike Hercs. Was there until late 63. then transferred to Headquarters, Pedricktown….

          Reply

          • Posted by Richard M. Levine on October 9, 2015 at 12:44 PM

            While the Nike bases were directly under command of the Army, they reported up to the Air Force. The Air Force sent out their jet interceptors against the enemy, and any missed enemy aircraft would then be designated to the Nike batteries. It was a little more complicated than this during the few years the Air Force BOMARC missiles were in service. They would be utilized somewhere in this order of defense also after the jet interceptors. Interestingly, there could have been nuclear warheads on the Genie rockets carried by the jet interceptors, or on the BOMARC missiles or Nike Hercules missiles. Most people did not know of this extensive use of nuclear weapons. Since they were top secret, advertising of their potential use was not done.

            Reply

          • Yes as I recollect when I was there in late 1960 thru Feb 1963 there were Ajax and switched to Herc around the time I left. Time fades on you. 😉

            Reply

      • Posted by Richard M. Levine on March 10, 2012 at 11:54 PM

        Do you have any sentry dog photos that I can use in a book I am writing and in a Mahwah Museum display I am working on? Thanks!

        Reply

  21. Some Good Stuff!!! Little stranfe.

    Reply

  22. Posted by rob on March 22, 2009 at 5:51 PM

    hi i have been attempting to study the nike base located in Pitman, NJ known as PH-49. Does anybody have any information petaining to it preferably someone that may have been posted there in the 60’s .

    Reply

  23. Nice web site. I was stationed at the Swedesboro Nike Ajax site during the early 1960s.
    OH! You’re my new favorite blogger fyi

    Reply

    • Posted by lostinjersey on March 20, 2009 at 7:50 AM

      Thanks. Lots of material is being transferred from my old site, and I hae lots of brand new material to post, so keep coming back.

      Reply

  24. Posted by Chuck on March 19, 2009 at 11:21 AM

    Nice web site. I was stationed at the Swedesboro Nike Ajax site during the early 1960s.

    Reply

  25. Posted by John on March 19, 2009 at 11:00 AM

    Hey, it me Agent 117 again. I have now been back to the other part of the Woolwich Nike Base. I was right, The part that I was telling you about in the begging was in fact the launcher area. I have now been in to the Control area. This is what I found.

    Again me and two friends, left my house at about 11:30P.M. on bikes. We got to the base at about 11:45 and shot off down the side of the Barbed wire topped fence. We hide the bikes near a farmers field and found a hole in the fence. After a few minuets of walking threw heavy brush we came across an old basketball court. It was in pretty bad shape, all that was left of the nets were the poles that held them up. As we continued on we came across a swimming pool. Very weird, and it was in pretty good shape. At the time it was holding about 3 feet of rain water. We than out of the corner of our eyes, and threw some more trees we saw a large one story building. We finally made our way to it, and entered threw a door in the rear of the building. It was in semi-ok shape. But most of the roof was collapsed in. There were probably about 15 rooms. Some were larger than others. We figured that is where the officers stayed. They were also much nicer than the other rooms. The smaller rooms, which we figured were the normal soldier rooms, were much smaller, and on one of the doors, there was a diagram which showed how the room was to be set up.

    As we continued threw the building it led right into the mess hall. It was a very large room, with a kitchen, and a buffet style line. On the other side of the room there was another door, which led outside. We went threw the door and again I found a yellow symbol with a black line threw it. As with the one in the launcher area it had the same message. And on the inside of the building there was a door with a large number one on it in yellow and the door itself was red. The door was about 5 inches thick and made of steal. We left the building and proceed down a road way which was parallel to the main gate. As we walked we came across a large circular structure that went about 15 feet off of the ground, and had a yellow later up the one side. So of course I had to climb it. At the top It was all concrete with a hole in the middle, it was about 4 foot wide. And the entire thing was hollow inside of it. The only thing I can think it was, was a gun turret or something of that matter. I could now see the radar towers and proceeded to the closest one. I was able to find a latter on the side and me and my two friends climbed the 50 or so feet to the top. On top it was completely concrete with the exception of a large hole at one side that was for all of the electrical lines and so on. There were four towers all the same. What was cool was they were all in very good shape and very stable. Also around the bottom of the towers was a large building. The control rooms for the radar towers. They were very big, and on one end of the room there were these large fuse panels. But one thing that we had noticed in all of the buildings, is that every wire in the entire place was cut. Almost like someone took the time to cut them all. By that time it was very late and we decided to leave. There was a large area that we didn’t get to check out and we still have yet to get into the missile magazines in the launcher area. I am still working on the diagram, and I am working on getting a digital camera and GPS unit. As soon as I get the rest of the information I will surely pass it along to you. Also if I find anything else of interest in my area I will pass it along, but for now I am out. Talk later. -Agent 117-

    Reply

  26. Posted by John on March 19, 2009 at 11:00 AM

    Its me John (Agent 117) again. I would like to and a new development I have just realized about the trip to the Nike Base that I had made. Upon some research, I think the part of the base that I was in, was actually the Launcher Area, and not the Communications/Radar Area. At first I figured that they would have kept the C/R area in the rear off of the road. But actually the towers that I saw that were closest to the road were the radar towers. People had always told me that the towers were actually missile silos, but when I did the research I found out that they were the radar towers instead. So I now believe that I was actually in the Launcher area and not the C/R area. I am currently working on a diagram of the area I was in, and upon completion I will send a copy to you. I will try to give you a heads up, when I am planning on going back. But I can’t make any promises, due to the fact that usually we don’t make up our minds until the last min. But I will talk to the other people and see what I can do. I will also be glad to answer any questions you might have, and like I said I will keep you informed. -John- (Agent 117)

    Reply

  27. Posted by John on March 19, 2009 at 11:00 AM

    Hi, my name is John. Also known as Agent 117. I noticed on your web site a small section on the Nike missile base in Sandy Hook. Well I live right down the street from a Nike Missile base. It is located on Swedesboro-Paulsboro Rd. in Woolwich Township, Gloucester County. I have not been into the launcher area yet, but I have been into the communications area. This is the story…..

    Me, and two friends, left my house at about 1:30a.m, on a Saturday morning. We parked on Belfur drive, which is located just across the street from the base. We proceeded down a private farmers road quite quickly, so not to be spotted. We got to the main entrance of the base, and hopped the fence. There was a long wide road that proceeded right in front of us. We walked down the road to a large one story L shaped building. Upon finding an entrance we entered. The building was in bad shape. A lot of the roof had collapsed in, but we were able to proceed threw the entire building. Upon some investigating, we determined that this was the crew housing. There were multiple rooms on both sides of the hall way, and each door had a number on it. When we rounded the corner of the building, we saw a guard station at the entrance of the building. There was a place where they would hand ID tags and all. There was also an old First Aid Station on the wall. We didn’t fin d much in the building, but we did notice a sign, when we exited the building that said,” Chemical& Biological Storage Area, If anything is leaking from any canisters or there is a strong odor, Put on your gas mask and proceed to the nearest exit immediately.” That gave us all a surprise. We than moved on down the road to an intersection. We made a right, which led in between to large man made hills. Right in the middle of the road was a Metal building, with a large scale inside. We investigated the building and determined that it was a place where the missiles were weighed, before they were taken to the magazines. We than proceeded the rest of the way around the large horse shoe shaped hill, and came back out on to the main road. We walked about 20 yards and noticed off to the right, what looked to be chicken coops. We walked over to them. We don’t know what was kept in them but we do know that it was some sort of pet or something.

    There were four of them and each had a name on it. Rex, Prince, Killer, and King was the names on the little houses. When we were finished there we proceeded back down the main road, which than opened into a large concrete field. About every 20 yards there was two large metal doors, and entrance hatches every 40. It was amazing. There were light posts all over, and even a few guard shacks spotted the area. I figured it was were the missiles were lowered underground, so they could be transported to the missile magazines, and then to the launcher area. We tried to get on of the hatches open but they had all been welded shut. But we were able to find a hole in one of the large doors, and from what I could see, they were all full of water. How much I don’t know. I am very determined to get into the underground tunnels and I will sooner or later. The bad thing was we had reached the end of the base, so we proceeded to back track, when we noticed to our right a small building. We started to walk over to it, there w as what looked to be a large sand box, with pipes going threw it. Upon closer investigation we decided that, that was the waste water treatment area. We walked back into the woods about 15 yards and found large open top tanks, which we figured helped in the water treatment. When we finished scoping out that area, we proceeded back to the front gates, and exited the area. We got back in the car and left.

    That was what happened. We did have plans to sneak into the Launcher area, but on the day we were going to do it, someone tipped off the cops that we were going to be back there. When we heard this we decided not to go. But we will be making a trip back there very soon. I will let you know what I find. From what I can see from the road, there is a few buildings that look to be more crew housing, also there is about 4 or 5 missile silos, and an entrance to the underground tunnels. But I can’t be sure until I get back there. But I will be sure to keep you informed. If you wish you can publish this entire e-mail. That is why I didn’t include my last name. Sorry I don’t have any pictures, but when I go to sneak into the Launcher area I will have a camera, so I will be sure to send you some pictures. Well until next time.

    Reply

    • Posted by Andrew on June 8, 2009 at 7:54 PM

      John(Agent 117),

      I live not that far from the nike base and have never been in it. I read in the paper today that the township is taking it over, and looking for contractors to demolish it. I was wondering if you would want to meet up before you go in the next time? I’d love to see it before they level it. Drop me a line at south.jersey.84@gmail.com.

      Andrew

      Reply

    • Posted by George on May 23, 2010 at 8:50 PM

      The animal cages were for guard dogs although I believe some were sent to Nam. You were in the launcher area. The control area was closest to Swedesboro right on the main rd. which had a barracks, admin. bldg, mess hall, small generator bldg. and control bldg. I think that was it. I do not remember a swimming pool. I was there in 1965.

      Reply

      • Posted by Harold on September 23, 2011 at 9:31 PM

        My husband was stationed at this site in 1966 and I am trying to find a Unit Patch. Do you have any information that would help me.

        I can be emailed at retpol96@roadrunner.com

        Thank you.

        Reply

        • Posted by Darrell Keighley on January 28, 2014 at 11:35 AM

          There was no Unit Patch or insignia, per se. On overseas installations, there was a Battalion level pin, which was worn on the epaulets of a Class A uniform, however, there was no such insignia for Stateside units. All Statesside batteries were under the command of ARADCOM (Army Air Defense Command), and wore an ARADCOM patch on uniforms. The patch was a red shield, with a yellow missile and a yellow lightening bolt on either side.

          Reply

      • Posted by Helene Kielson on August 20, 2015 at 11:25 AM

        Hi. I am trying to help my brother Harold Michaels. He was stationed at the Swedsboro Nike Site in 64-65. He is looking for anyone who was stationed there at that time. A Michael Cavelarei or Richie Cadena or anyone else. You may email me at helenekielson@yahoo.com with any info you might have. Thanks in advance.
        Helene

        Reply

    • Posted by R.Paul on November 25, 2011 at 12:08 AM

      You WERE IN THE LAUNCHER AREA the other area with the 5 towers was the control area with the radars,,, oh ,one other thing that thing you thought was a scale to weigh missile’s was the warhead assembly area and you don’t want to know what used to be in there…

      Reply

    • Posted by Darrell Keighley on January 28, 2014 at 11:37 AM

      King almost had me for supper, one night. Not a friendly dog, at all!

      Reply

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