The cemetery of Abraham Lincoln’s great aunt

In the early 1700’s, Mordecai & Abraham Lincoln lived an area of NJ that is now Imlaystown, not far from Great Adventure. Moredcai married a local girl, and they had a daughter Deborah. Our 16th president would be their great great grandson. Deborah died at age 3 and was buried near the family farm in the Old Robbins Burial Place. Shortly afterwards, the Lincolns moved to Pennsylvania, and their children moved to Virginia, Indiana, and eventually Kentucky, where Abraham was eventually born.

In 1989, a local genealogist, Stephen Conte produced a local cable show entitled “Family Historian” and he went out to Debbie’s grave as part of research for his program. The graveyard sits just outside the Assunpink Wildlife Management which is named after a tribe of Lenape Indians, the Assanpinks. Daniel Robbins (whose burial ground is what we’ve been talking about) purchased 810 acres of land in 1696, running from Stone Tavern Lake to Imlaystown Road. The land changed hands a few times before being acquired thru the Green Acres Program in the 60’s. The land around here used to be all farms and the now is being rapidly developed. Hopefully this graveyard will be preserved along with these woods.

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16 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 4:21 PM

    Paul Tarlowe is a member of Friends of Long Pond Ironworks who help w projects like this.
    You can also try him at :
    http://www.longpondironworks.org/

    Friend me
    Judith Rieman Breitstein

    Reply

  2. Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 4:15 PM

    Judith Rieman Breitstein

    Reply

  3. Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 3:52 PM

    Cemetery is part of Assunpink Wildlife Management Area
    Contact Paul Tarlowe…wildlife education specialist at
    http://WWW.njfishandwildlife.com/

    He can guide you. Is interested in getting involved in this kind of thing. I’m in Florida through June w my mom who has a broken hip.
    Would love if you friend me on Facebook so I can keep up w your progress. I actually contacted Harold Holzer to see if he showed interest but no go.
    Also would love to see a sign opposite the Happy Apple Inn in Imlaystown where Mordecai and his brother, Abraham, Lincoln settled and Mordecai married Hannah Salter.

    Reply

  4. Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 9:31 AM

    I contacted the DEP. Very nice but no money to help. Spot is difficult to get to and almost no parking. You will find you need to go deeper into the woods than one would think. Keep your eyes open for the iron bars around Debbie’s grave that some one put up after Lincoln’s assassination. You might also want to check out the Olde Yellow Meeting House when you’re in the neighborhood. Lincoln’s family on his maternal side (,Mordecai’s wife’s side) the Salters, are buried there. Just a beautiful spot.

    Reply

  5. Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 9:22 AM

    Would absolutely love to hear what you find. Take gloves and wear long pants. Last May, so many thorns and ticks

    Reply

    • How did you find it?

      Reply

      • Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 1:58 PM

        Had looked for it for years to no avail. Finally asked my phone to Google Olde Robbins Burial Place. Large solitary marker on road. Set very far back. Can’t see it from highway.

        Reply

        • Funny you mentioned that marker, I just happened to pass that before I messaged you. Found the site. Wow, just wow. I was amazed at home many grave markers that were so old and weathered that they were barely visible. If I could organize a cleanup project of that site it would be a massive undertaking. I am passing the info and pictures back to my group to see what we can find out. Do you happen to know who owns that property?

          Reply

      • Posted by judith Breitstein on April 16, 2016 at 1:59 PM

        Asked my phone to Google Olde Robbins Burial Place. Large solitary marker on road. Set very far back. Can’t see it from highway.

        Reply

  6. I just ran across this blog post last week and was shocked that this historical gem is so close to me and so unknown. I am a member of JPI (Jersey Paranormal Investigations) and in addition to investigating the paranormal, we also help to fund raise for historical sites as well as help to clean up grave yards. This sounds like a challenge, and the importance of this site cannot be overlooked. I am headed out there this afternoon to take a look at the site, and I will continue to research until I find out how our group can help out this massively important site.

    Reply

  7. Posted by Judith Breitstein on June 10, 2015 at 2:41 PM

    We visited the grave of Debbie Lincoln on May 25, 2015. It was extremely difficult to reach and incredibly overgrown. I believe if measures aren’t taken soon to cut back the vines and forest growth, this little cemetery will be lost to history. There is barely room for two cars to park and I believe some kind of permission to start chopping would be needed.

    Reply

  8. Posted by Judith Breitstein on May 26, 2015 at 2:24 PM

    Found Debbie Lincoln’s grave, deep deep in the woods. Cemetery appears abandoned. Most stones are covered with vines, thorns and disappearing fast. Very difficult to reach. Can’t believe some Lincoln group hasn’t taken this up as a cause. Really heartbreaking to lose this.

    Reply

    • Posted by Frederick Clark on May 27, 2015 at 12:04 PM

      While I can’t do a lot, I’d like to be part of a group cleaning and preserving this site.

      Reply

      • Posted by judi breitstein on May 27, 2015 at 2:20 PM

        Trying to reach various folks to help get this site cleared. Too massive for a couple of volunteers and probably need some kind of permission to do that kind of work there. The pictures on Findagrave are years old and don’t show how badly this place is disappearing.

        Reply

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