Posts Tagged ‘t2v’

More information on the crash of the jet in the woods

Thanks to someone from Fort Tilden for the tips!

Article

1962 — A single-jet Lockheed, originating from the Naval Air Station at Floyd Bennett Field, Brooklyn, N.Y., crashed into a “heavily wooded swamp” reportedly infested with poisonous snakes. The site was two miles from Bubbling Springs Lake, between Union Valley and Macopin Roads.

The troubled plane was first spotted by a worker in the Bearfort Fire Tower. He alerted police and a plane was sent out from Greenwood Lake Airport to locate the crash site. First on the scene were Captain John Ryan and Sergeant Louis Hall, who drove to the edge of the swamp, then ran, zigzagging for miles, searching for the plane, taking their cues from the search plane above. They found two Marine Reserve officers standing a distance away from the burning wreckage.

The flyers said at the time that their plane had “flamed out” and their ejection mechanisms had failed. The two airmen were taken to Chilton Hospital with back injuries and abrasions.

Here is a drawing of possible paint scheme:

In July 1961 there were 3 T2Vs at the base:

In Jan 1962, there were 4 T2Vs at the base:

In later reports, there were 3 at the base:

http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1963-jul62.pdf
http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1963-jan.pdf
http://www.history.navy.mil/a-record/nao53-68/fy1964-jan.pdf

It is possible that this fouth aircraft was the one that crashed in NJ.

Interested in the military history of Gateway NRA? Check out the following web sites:

“Historic Fort Tilden” in Rockaway, Queens, NY: http://www.geocities.com/fort_tilden
“Historic Floyd Bennett Field” in Brooklyn, NY: http://www.geocities.com/floyd_bennett_field
“Historic Miller Field” in Staten Island, NY: http://www.geocities.com/miller_field

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Jet in the Woods Identified!

After a great amount of debate over what model plane the jet was, the question has been answered definitively.

This is an email I got from Ian

I went and visited the crash site back a month or so and took alot of pix, came home and did some research. I wasn’t aware of this discussion board at the time, but figuring that orange and white paint generally indicates a trainer aircraft, I went looking for trainers used by the military during the 60’s. I saw in a few places people who thought this wreck was an F-80 or a T-33, among other things but there was always a section of the aircraft that just didn’t match up to those suggestions. Finally I ran across a picture of the Lockheed T2V-1 “Seastar” and I was convinced that the West Milford wreck was one of these jets. Everything matched up, from the position of the horizontal stabilizers on the tail section, to the style of intake. And once I was made aware of this site, and I read through all the posts, I was more convinced than ever. Now, a month later, I thought I would bring my friend out to see the crash since it was a nice day and we both are airplane lovers. Since there was alot less snow today due to the temperature, there was a bit more to see than the first time I visited. After spending a good hour or so examining the wreckage, close to the fuselage, near a hydraulic line in the starboard wing, I found a blue stamp on the now exposed ribs of the wing that reads: NAVY T2V-1. I think this should hopefully clear up any doubts as to the type of aircraft that crashed into the West Milford woods all those years ago. Cheers!

Here is a website about the T2V