Tamarack Lodge

Sitting on 400 acres, the Tamarack lodge was built inthe early 1900s as a simple boarding house and was expanded in 1927. At its peak it would have 300 rooms and the resort had all the activities one would expect from a retreat in the Borscht Belt of Ulster County, NY. The location primarily catered to jewish familes and provided popular entertainment of the day, which in the 60s meant Cream, the Who and Janis Joplin.

There was a massive fire in 1995 which effectively shuttered the resort.It remained functionmal till 2000 when the health dept closed them down. the property sat unused for a decade until another fire broke out destroying 30 buildings in 2012.

Now there is very little left. There are only 3 primary buildings left along with some sort of storage building and a half dozen bungalows at the back of the property. the main building floors are extremely unstable and the rar building has had a partial collapse of the roof.

You can see pictures of it before the fire at this site.

Tamarack Lodge

Unnamed research facility

i would love to tell the story behind this place but doing so would reveal its location. its a nice find and although there is some graffiti its pretty untouched and I wanna keep it that way. Plus its highly visible and highly illegal. All ill say is that it used to be a farm and later became a research lab.

all the Flickr pictures

abandoned NJT engines on the old DL&W rail line

The Delaware, Lackwanna and Western rail lines that services from morris county thru Sussex County and into PA were closed down years ago. the rail lines coming up from the east diverged into two lines in Landing. the line that went west into Warren County remains active, but the other line was shut down. You can walk the trail 30 miles from Landing all the way to the Paulsinkill Viaduct which crosses the Delaware. Some time in 2010 NJT pretty much abandoned 29 apparently functional engines along the line somewhere (location not disclosed). They’ve been completely sealed up, except for one train which someone pried open. Along the way to them i found an old stone rail building. its completely sealed up and unless one has a blow torch, access isn’t possible.

more details on the history of the line closer from wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delaware,_Lackawanna_and_Western_Railroad

All the pics on Flickr

Bats Future Looks Bleak

According to this article efforts to save the little brown bat in NJ is pretty much a lost cause. They’ve lost 95% of their population since 2009 to the white-nose syndrome. I remember visiting the Bat Hibernaculum in Morris County about 7-8 years ago and it was amazing watching them swarm in (or out)… now you wouldn’t see that, they’re just not there.

Abandoned PA Greenhouse

The farm is being leveled and being turned into townhouses. Someone went in with backhoes and big machines and leveled all the growth that had occurred inside. I couldn’t say how long this place had sat unused but it must’ve been a while judging from the density and height of the growth.

More pics here

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Rusting cars on the Columbia Trail

I was biking on the Columbia trail thru califon and came across these cars. they’re definitely on someone property so I kept a respectful distance.

 

 

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The Art Walk on the Raritan

Albus Cavus is a group of artists which originated in new brunswick whose goal is to reclaim bad neighborhoods and run down areas thru public art. When one says public art, one might think of large expensive sculptures or art by well known famous artists which you can;t get close to. Their idea of public art is art in the most unexpected places, something positive and uplifting rather than the graffiti that is so often associated with poverty, crime, and neighborhoods that have need for urban renewal.

In 2007 they attempted to transform the Raritan Walk, a 1.8 mile stretch of walkway along the Raritan River into one of the largest murals in the world. Local artists were invited to add their artwork to what was otherwise a blighted stretch of concrete. In this article the idea of Albus Cavus is discussed, including the art walk in New Brunswick as well as one in DC. The hope was to maintain it and keep it fresh, but sadly that has not been the case.

I visited it in spring 2015. The art was still there and its rather impressive. The walk however, was clearly home to small groups of homeless. The vegetation was barely in check and there was garbage and debris all along its path. There was also signs that the homeless were feeding a local colony of cats. I didn’t feel entirely safe, despite not seeing any obvious threat. It is desolate and far from aid should one need it. It also appears as if the art murals done 10 years ago have been covered with your typical graffiti. If one wishes to visit, the best way to do so is park at Elmer Boyd Park and just walk North.

 

 
More Pictures here

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